PC or Console, which do you prefer?

PC or Console

  • Console

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • PC

    Votes: 2 22.2%
  • Both

    Votes: 7 77.8%

  • Total voters
    9

Karnath

Well-Known Member
#1
I was just wondering where everyone preferred to do there gaming and if they had any particular reasoning.

Personally I use both depending on the type of game I'm playing, I'm a massive RPG nerd and I prefer to play JRPGs on console while there are others that work better on a pc. Plus admittedly the set up for sound is better on my tv.
 

Contrabardus

Well-Known Member
#2
I don't really know anyone who PC games that will play games they have on PC on a console.

I'm not talking about folks that have ten year old pre-built Walmart PCs and "game" on them by playing Solitaire, 90s Doom, or Minecraft on low settings. I mean people that actively play modern games on that platform.

You can use any console style of gamepad on PC with little effort in setting it up, especially an Xbox 1 controller. The Xbox 1 controller is natively supported by Windows, so it will work with most games with no fuss.

All you need to pair a PS4 or Xbox 1 controller to a PC is internal Bluetooth or a cheap USB Bluetooth dongle.

For the DS4 you'll need the Steam Client, which natively supports it, and DS4windows for those extremely rare cases where Steam doesn't want to cooperate with a specific game.

Any modern PC will have an HDMI out, and there are plenty of easy and cheap streaming solutions if you don't want to move a tower around.

Steam Link is one solution, it costs about as much as a game if it isn't on sale. Yes, it works with non-steam games. Wired is the best way to set it up if possible, but wireless works well too. I don't know that you can get a modem that doesn't have wifi on it anymore. It also natively supports the DS4, Xbox 1 pad, Wii U pad, and Steam Controller without any dongles.

The only exceptions are usually "I only play multiplayer and none of my friends have this game on PC".

PC games have more options for controls, sound just as good, and the vast majority of the time look and run better. Even when they don't they are at least equivalent to consoles in most cases.

I don't know why anyone would play something on a console if there is a PC version available to them. I mean, I get if a game was a timed exclusive and you don't want to buy it a second time, but all things being equal gamers will go for the PC version of whatever if they have the option.
 
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Karnath

Well-Known Member
#3
Yes but as I said I am a major RPG nerd, and I like playing JRPGs on console (plus some of them are only available on console). There is also the fact that playing on console requires a great deal less work. I'm not a big fan of constantly trying to keep up with pc hardware releases, it can get very expensive. If graphics aren't the most important thing to you and you own the console I don't really see any reason not to get games for it.
 

Contrabardus

Well-Known Member
#4
Yes but as I said I am a major RPG nerd, and I like playing JRPGs on console (plus some of them are only available on console). There is also the fact that playing on console requires a great deal less work. I'm not a big fan of constantly trying to keep up with pc hardware releases, it can get very expensive. If graphics aren't the most important thing to you and you own the console I don't really see any reason not to get games for it.
I accounted for exclusives. That's definitely a good reason to play games on console.

I own consoles, and exclusives are basically the only reason I do. However, I never buy anything available for PC on any of them.

You can play an JRPG the exact same way you can on a console on PC. You can use the exact same controller. In fact, on PC you generally have more options available. Any console gamepad will work, even the Switch Pro controller will work on PC with minimal setup. You can even use the gyro functions of the Switch Pro and DS4.

I do this all the time with JRPGs. I played Nii No Kuni 2 not long ago on PC using my DS4. I got it on sale so it was cheaper than it was on consoles, and it looked better thanks to hardware improvements.

The only real difference is that the game will generally look better on a PC because it will have more graphics options and will probably run at a higher framerate. It's not just texture detail either, you could see improvements to particle effects, draw distance, and various other things that may actually have a small impact on gameplay. For example, a higher draw distance can mean that in some games you'll be able to spot distant enemies sooner, making sniping a more viable strategy.

As I said before, I get not buying a game a second time just because it has a PC release, but there's really no reason to buy something for a console if it is available for PC. Not even for TV gaming because things like Steam Link exist, which again, works for more than just Steam.

Plus, games are frequently cheaper on PC and go on sale more often. This is a huge factor. Why am I going to pay $59 for a console version when I can frequently get the same game for what is often significantly less? I rarely pay more than $39 for a PC game, and often get even more significant discounts thanks to things like Steam Sales and Humble Bundle.

Why do you think you need to "keep up" with hardware releases? If you really think that's true you are woefully misinformed, because that's a total myth.

Just because you might not be able to turn up all the graphics settings to "ultra" doesn't mean you need to upgrade a PC. There are people who do that, but it's not necessary at all to outdo console hardware.

You don't need to upgrade a PC as frequently as you'd need to buy a new console. A decent PC will actually last you longer, two or three console cycles in fact if you get high end parts.

Yes that means a higher initial investment, but long term it's actually cheaper. You're generally paying less for games and don't need to buy new hardware as often.

If you build a PC that's has better hardware than a console it will be better than that console for it's entire lifespan. There's no software upgrade that will change that.

I have a newer parts in my PC because I needed to upgrade for VR, but my Dad is still using one that I built him in 2012. He's retired and housebound, so he games a lot. It has a 6GB Radeon HD 7980, an i7 3770k, and 16 GB of Ram. It will still run most modern games at maxed out settings at better than 30fps. Usually 60+FPS as most games don't even really try to challenge hardware at the highest settings.

That hardware actually has slightly better specs than the PS4 Pro and Xbox 1 S. It will run games that look better than either console, mostly due to having more memory available even though some of the processing is slightly slower.

I'm not talking about indie pixel art games either, DMC 5, Resident Evil 2, Far Cry 5, Rage 2, Doom, etc...

There are cases where he sometimes has to turn a setting or two down a notch to get something to run over 30fps. Deus Ex Mankind Divided he had to drop MSAA to x2, shadows to high, and specular reflections to high. Still better than the settings used in the console versions, which is equivalent to running everything on "high" in the PC version.

Occasionally if he overmods something like Skyrim, he has to turn down one or two settings to merely "very high" or "high", usually shadows. Which is still higher settings than the console versions use.

When the next generations of consoles come out, I won't even have to build him an entirely new PC. Most likely I'll just have to replace the GPU and maybe the CPU with something slightly better and his PC will be better than the PS5 and Xbox 2 for the entire lifespan of either console.

That's exactly what I did for my PC as well. I didn't buy or build a new one, just upgraded a couple of parts. The only reason I did it is because of VR, which has very high hardware requirements due to the very high rendering, resolution, latency, and framerate requirements of VR, not because it was struggling to run modern games.

Also, Mods are worth mentioning for PC. Yes, you can mod certain games on console, but you can't do anything close to what you can do on PC with those titles. Mods are the only reason certain games are still relevant on PC to this day.

In some cases, you can even use mods to turn one game into an entirely different game. This video is for a mod for Skyrim called Enderal that converts it into an entirely different game. It is also 100% free.


None of the consoles have this mod. They can't run it due to console restrictions on mods.
 
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Karnath

Well-Known Member
#5
But I mostly play those exclusive games or games on older consoles that I already have. I have a massive collection of PS1 and PS2 games, and the games I have played the most this generation are Persona 5 and Xenoblade Chronicles 2 (as well as Diablo 3 on console but that's mainly for the couch co-op), and those are both console exclusives. Don't get me wrong games like Witcher 3, Skyrim, and Divinity Original Sin 2 are games that I would only play on pc, but I have been playing my JRPGs on console for twenty some years and that's just how I enjoy playing that particular style of game. It doesn't particularly matter that consoles aren't as powerful because a great many of those games don't have the highest end graphics. Dragon Quest XI came out last September and I didn't even consider getting it for pc, simply because I enjoy the physical experience of putting the disk in my PS4 and sitting down to play one of my favourite game series.
 

PCHeintz72

The Sentient Fanfic Search Engine mk II
#6
Only thing I've personally used game consoles in the last decade plus is streaming, generally Netflix or Crunchyroll, sometimes Hulu and Crackle...

On the other hand, I'm not much of a gamer anymore. I got out long ago as I disliked both the trends away from joysticks (I had game pads and that horrible WII interface), and the trend toward on-line access being required to play games. It used to be you buy a game, it was a one time purchase. And if you had the console, you could play it a decade or more later. Now, not so much.

On the gripping hand (sci-fi novel reference), I built a rolling cabinet consisting of many game consoles and switchboxes for my 8 year old nephew... All the older consoles both myself and my brother still had, plus some cheap ebay purchases... Atari/Coleco/Intelli/Sega flashbacks, Nintendo 64, Retro Duo Nintendo clone, a converter cartridge for gameboy, and PSII and PSIII and PSIV.
 

Contrabardus

Well-Known Member
#7
But I mostly play those exclusive games or games on older consoles that I already have. I have a massive collection of PS1 and PS2 games, and the games I have played the most this generation are Persona 5 and Xenoblade Chronicles 2 (as well as Diablo 3 on console but that's mainly for the couch co-op), and those are both console exclusives. Don't get me wrong games like Witcher 3, Skyrim, and Divinity Original Sin 2 are games that I would only play on pc, but I have been playing my JRPGs on console for twenty some years and that's just how I enjoy playing that particular style of game. It doesn't particularly matter that consoles aren't as powerful because a great many of those games don't have the highest end graphics. Dragon Quest XI came out last September and I didn't even consider getting it for pc, simply because I enjoy the physical experience of putting the disk in my PS4 and sitting down to play one of my favourite game series.
That's kind of a very niche thing then. I also accounted for all of this regarding stuff that isn't available on PC.

Still, generally most people don't play like you do.

Hell, a lot of people who play the same kinds of retro games don't play the way you do anymore.

Take me for example. I emulate, so I'm still using a PC for that kind of gaming. I have a retro gamepad that's basically a wireless Snes pad, but I also use a DS4 for PS era and beyond games. I have my entire retro Atari systems, Nes, Game Boy, GBA, Master System, Genesis, Sega CD, TG 16, NeoGeo, Game Gear, NDS, Snes, N64, PS1, Xbox, Jaguar, PS2, and Wii collection installed on one small device that is hooked up to my TV via HDMI.

They all work exactly the same as they would in any of the consoles. Except in some cases the controller is a little more comfortable and has a few more buttons than I need. I can also use my Wiimotes with it and have a battery powered sensor bar. The sensor bar is basically just an IR emitter. You can actually replace it with a couple of candles and your Wiimote will still work.

I have a Raspberry Pi hooked up to a multi TB external drive full of roms with several emulators installed on it. It's like those little mini-consoles, but it covers all of my retro consoles and my entire library of games. It is also worth pointing out that I own a physical copy of every game and that I have installed on that system.

I fail to see how playing Dragon Quest XI on PC is functionally any different from playing it on the PS4 if you're using the same controller and are able to play it on the same screen and sound system.

I prefer to have more options. With a PC version, I can play a game anywhere I can access my Steam account from, I can still play it console style from the couch by streaming it, and have access to my saves from other devices thanks to cloud saves. That means way more to me than the "experience" of a physical disk in a console.

Say I'm traveling for some reason and have several hours to kill in a hotel room. Well, I don't have my PS4 with me, and my PC is at home. However, my laptop will run Dragon Quest XI, has Steam installed, and the only extra thing I had to bring was my DS4 and a charging cable. I'm good to go and can pick up right where I left off at home.

PC's options trump the "feeling" of playing on a console with a physical copy, which I can't actually quantify as any different functionally. Actually, I can. Because my internal drive loads much faster than any physical disk will.

If PC is an option, assuming I wouldn't have to buy something I already own a second time, I'll pretty much always pick PC. I think most PC gamers would agree with me.
 
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Karnath

Well-Known Member
#8
Yes but the poll and question isn't about which is better it's about what you prefer, and I prefer having physical copies of most of my games. If I owned DQ11 on pc I wouldn't have a physical copy, plus the simple fact that my internet is limited and downloading games really isn't an option for me. Yeah sorry I don't want to argue about this anymore that wasn't why I started this topic, it isn't so that someone can put down one way of playing over the other it was simply because I was curious about what people played on and why.
 

Contrabardus

Well-Known Member
#9
Yes but the poll and question isn't about which is better it's about what you prefer, and I prefer having physical copies of most of my games. If I owned DQ11 on pc I wouldn't have a physical copy, plus the simple fact that my internet is limited and downloading games really isn't an option for me. Yeah sorry I don't want to argue about this anymore that wasn't why I started this topic, it isn't so that someone can put down one way of playing over the other it was simply because I was curious about what people played on and why.
It is answering your question. You asked why, and everything I've posted is reasons why. It might not be the answer you were expecting, the answer you wanted, or an answer you like, but my posts on the whole are indeed a legitimate and on topic answer to the question as it was presented.

No one is putting anything down. Feel free to quote me to back that claim up because it never happened.

You've also posted several misconceptions that are just flat out wrong. Why would I not address them?

I don't even really think this qualifies as an argument really, we're not really arguing about anything. I never said that how you do things is wrong. In fact, all I really did was explain viable alternatives, what I do, and why I do it. You'll notice that much of my previous posts are actually first person about myself and what I do. Again, which is actually answering your question.

I do occasionally refer to "you" but it was always presented as suggestive and as example. For example, "You can play an JRPG the exact same way you can on a console on PC. You can use the exact same controller." Nothing about that is a command. It simply explains a possible option.

I did correct some misconceptions you posted, which is as close to an argument as this has gotten, but you didn't really present a counter argument or rebut any of it. We literally aren't arguing about anything.

You're kind of in a niche corner among gamers. You aren't representative of the norm. No one is going to come to your house with a sledgehammer and break your console and physical games and force you to install a streaming device and a PC that can only use digital media. This isn't some gaming inquisition.

I acknowledged and agreed that some of your reasons are good reasons for playing on consoles over PC. Particularly regarding exclusives or a lack of availability on PC. More than once. I also added an additional reason for why someone might prefer playing something on a console regarding multiplayer. In fact, I'm one of the "both" votes because of both of these reasons, they are legitimate deciding factors.

Still, PC has more options and versatility than consoles, that's simply an objective fact. Not just in regard to graphics sliders, but control options, modding, output options, game and hardware prices, and game selection. Pointing that out is not a "put down". Those are all good examples of reasons why people play on PC. It's also why PC is my preference if it is an option for any game. Which again, is an answer to the question as it is posed in the OP.

Speaking of misconceptions...

Unfortunately, regarding physical copies, PCHeintz is correct. Physical copies don't mean anything anymore.

Just because you own a game on disk, doesn't mean it will work in the future any more than a digital copy will. This is something I learned the hard way.

In fact, if one fails it is very likely that both will, for the exact same reasons.

Sure, with older consoles, that wasn't the case. I'm not talking about that in this case. Having those copies is definitely good, but it doesn't apply with more modern titles unfortunately.

I have consoles. In my experience modern consoles require just as much downloading as PC. In fact, it generally takes longer for a console to download and install something in my experience because they use console servers that limit bandwidth. I don't mean digital copies, I mean disk installs that require download installs to run in addition to information installed from the disk.

The disk itself often acts as a form of DRM as well, requiring the physical media itself to be inserted to verify the installed copy before it will run.

Having a physical copy of a game on the PS4 doesn't mean anything. You don't "own" the game, you just license it for use. It doesn't matter that you bought a disk unfortunately.

Yes, PS4 games do say they don't have DRM, and they are technically not being dishonest because the console doesn't have DRM that ties physical games to the hardware. However, many of those games do require downloads before they will run. DQ XI might be one of those exceptions, but that's just one game and doesn't really debunk my point on its own. Not to mention, even a lot of games that have the full initial install on the disk often require day one patches, because even though the game will technically install and run from the disk they are basically unplayable and broken without the update patches, many of which are massive.

Where are you going to get those downloads if anything happens to the severs, or if support for those games is simply discontinued? Are you going to leave them installed on your system forever? What happens if after that point your hard drive dies and has to be replaced, or you need to format it, or you accidentally delete an install?

Also, regarding the PS4 and DRM, it is worth pointing out that just because a game doesn't require a console verification, doesn't mean that the game itself doesn't have any DRM. Games may still have some level of publisher based DRM. It just means that you can sell a game used, or buy one, or lend it to someone else, and it isn't tied to a specific console.

A lot of PS4 games require an online connection, and not just for multiplayer, but because they need to download information to run properly. It's just not used to verify the game disk.

What all that means is that a game will not necessarily always work forever as long as you have a physical copy. It just means that as long as it does work it will work on any PS4.

How is that really any better than a digital copy?

They don't call it DRM, but it's effectively the same thing. The disk alone will not run the game, doesn't include any updates, and is often effectively just a partial install and download key. It just doesn't check to verify everything every time you boot the game up. It's marketing smoke and mirrors, and everyone does it to some extent, including PC outlets like Steam.

Buying a physical copy isn't security or future proofing. It doesn't guarantee anything, and isn't any more reliable than a digital copy unfortunately. If you think that, you're misinformed.

I own several games as physical copies that do not work anymore, and I mean single player games. There's nothing wrong with the disks, they just can't access online verification and no longer work for whatever reason, or only have partial installs on them and can no longer access the servers to download the rest of the game. There's nothing I can do about it and I simply just can't play those games anymore unless I buy newer versions, which would likely be digital versions.

My physical copy of the original Borderlands is a good example of this. This is true of both the original version, and the GOTY edition. They cannot be installed, will not run, and simply do not work thanks to the DRM. Gearbox and 2K do not support the game's DRM anymore.

In fact, the only way to play the game with a physical copy used to be a tool that let you use your physical copy to get a digital Steam version of the game. This was disabled not long ago right before when the remasters were announced, which is now the only way to play the original Borderlands. If you haven't already transferred your physical copy over to a digital version, you're out of luck.

This is perfectly legal because of how modern game licensing and EULAs work. Physical copies are not exempt, and are no more secure than digital copies are.

That's the unfortunate reality of modern gaming. It's also why I have no qualms whatsoever about emulation of my older games. My copies are permanent copies that don't need online verification and aren't licensed like any newer version I might buy.

If anything, PC DRM for digital downloads tends to be less restrictive overall. A lot of console digital downloads are tied to a specific machine. Nintendo is especially bad about this. Where as on PC they are generally account based. Sony also has DRM for digital downloads, but as I recall it is also account based.

That's pretty much how PC games work too. They aren't tied to particular machines, but accounts. As long as you can access that account, you can generally play the game on any PC. As long as your account works, the servers for the game are active, and the download is available, you should be able to run that game. That's pretty much the same boat you're in even with a physical copy of a game these days unfortunately.

With PC you have DRM free options like GoG. You download it and it's yours. You can copy it to whatever devices you want for your own use as many times as you want. It's effectively the same as a permanent DRM free physical copy as you can easily make permanent physical media with a DRM free version if you want. If anything PC has even more DRM free options than any console, including the PS4. Once a copy is made it will never require any additional downloads, updates, or verification to run.

If anything it's actually a little better, because if a DRM free digital copy of a game updates, you can just make a phyisical copy of the updated version of it and permanently have the most up to date version possible available to you.

You could say that once a PS4 game is installed, it will also never require additional downloads, updates, or verification.

However, I would counter that with the fact that you'd essentially have to eat up a big chunk of a very limited storage space for that. With DRM Free on PC, you can just burn a disk or use a flash drive to make a copy you can use on any PC at any point in the future.

I don't really see physical copies on consoles as any more secure than a digital copy on PC or consoles.

Sure, you might have limited bandwidth and all that, but you're no doubt making downloads for installs and updates anyway, and once something is installed, it's installed until you uninstall it. It's not like you have to download a PC game every time you play it any more than you would with a console game really. It's not really that different. Just another example of a misconception you have about PC gaming.
 
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Karnath

Well-Known Member
#10
No it isn't a misconception the amount of data I can download is limited and on the rare occasions that I download a game it causes me problems with my internet, and I have not asked a single question. Plus that doesn't change the fact that I enjoy owning physical copies of my games, and with how intrinsic Steam and it's like are to pc gaming these days that is rarely an option on the pc.
 

Antimatter

Well-Known Member
#11
Really depends on the game in question. I prefer to get mouse heavy games via PC, while most everything else is console these days. Also helps that its easier to play on console with the baby around.
 

Contrabardus

Well-Known Member
#12
No it isn't a misconception the amount of data I can download is limited and on the rare occasions that I download a game it causes me problems with my internet, and I have not asked a single question. Plus that doesn't change the fact that I enjoy owning physical copies of my games, and with how intrinsic Steam and it's like are to pc gaming these days that is rarely an option on the pc.
How can you seriously claim that you "Have not asked a single question"?

I was just wondering where everyone preferred to do there gaming and if they had any particular reasoning.
This is literally a question. It is presented as a statement, and you use "there" instead of "their", but it is a question. It is a request for information, you are literally requesting replies. My posts are direct and on topic answers to it.

Again, nearly all of my posts up until you got weirdly defensive are written in first person and are about -my- preferences and the reasoning for it. Which, again, as quoted above, is exactly what you asked for.

You just didn't like the answers because they didn't fit what you were expecting. This is starting to seem more and more like you're less interested in hearing about other people's preferences and the reasoning for it, which is literally the question that you posed in the OP, and more like you just want validation for your own preferences.

Stop trying so hard to make this seem like this is an argument where I'm slamming your preferences and telling you what to do. Neither has happened at any point.

There is no point/counter point going on here. It isn't actually an argument.

Literally all your replies are "Well I like doing things this way because..."

None of my replies say anything to the effect that you shouldn't. The only counter claims I have made are in reference to misinformation that has nothing to do with your personal preferences being right or wrong.

You claimed that you need to "constantly... keep up with pc hardware releases, it can get very expensive." Which is false. You don't need to do anything of the sort, and PC gaming is actually cheaper overall than modern console gaming.

Sure, you can spend a ton of money constantly upgrading, but you can do the exact same thing with a console. Constantly buying new versions and hardware like the PS4 Slim, PS4 Pro, PSVR, etc... Most people don't, just like most PC gamers don't constantly upgrade parts.

You also claimed "If graphics aren't the most important thing to you and you own the console I don't really see any reason not to get games for it."

PC has many other advantages other than just "better graphics", so this is a misconception and I detailed why.

You haven't really even tried to counter any of my points regarding any of that. Instead you just got defensive and acted as if it was somehow an attack on your personal preferences.

Also, regarding that last point about your downloads. That's not normal. Most people aren't in your situation.

Most people don't largely game on retro consoles either, which also has a huge impact on your preferences and costs. Your posts make it sound like you're mostly gaming on 20 year old hardware, and that's inexpensive and doesn't have the same requirements as modern gaming. That's fairly unique and puts you in an extremely niche place, even among console gamers.

Again, no one said there was anything wrong with either. You seem to think so, but it never happened.

However, everything I said applies to the majority of gamers. Buying new games on disk does not really guarantee that a copy will work any more than it does when you buy a digital copy.

You seemed to imply that the security of owning a physical copy so that it would always be available to play was at least a partial motivation to your reasoning for buying new games that way. That is unfortunately not the reality of modern gaming anymore.

That doesn't suggest in any way that you should stop buying that way. Just that you should understand that a physical copy is no longer any more guaranteed to work in the future than a digital one is anymore. That's simply the reality of the industry right now thanks to DRM, online patch updates, patch culture in development [release it broken and unfinished, patch it later], servers, and how EULAs are structured.

Physical and Digital copies are in the same boat regarding all that.

Most -modern- physical copies of AAA release console games require huge downloads to work. Either due to disks only containing partial installs, or because of patches that are pretty much required because the games are basically broken without them. It is often nearly as much as just downloading a digital copy of a game in a lot of cases. Plus, patch updates tend to be bigger on consoles than on a PC. This includes the PS4.

That doesn't mean that PC never has huge patch updates, just that console updates tend to be larger in general.

This is for several reasons, the way file structure and storage works on consoles, and the fact that updates tend to be less frequent on consoles due to having to be approved.

You're also ignoring the fact that most PC games are actually less than 15 GB. Sure, the huge AAA titles can get pretty big, but they only make up a very small portion of PC games. About two thirds of the games I own on Steam are less than 10 GB downloads. A fair number of those are as small as around 1-2 GB.

If you have bandwidth limitations that make file sizes that small a struggle, how are you even here?
 
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Karnath

Well-Known Member
#13
It was asking where you like to play not asking you to insult where everyone else enjoys playing there games because in your opinion there is no reason to play any game on console when it's also available on pc.
 

Contrabardus

Well-Known Member
#14
It was asking where you like to play not asking you to insult where everyone else enjoys playing there games because in your opinion there is no reason to play any game on console when it's also available on pc.
That never happened. Feel free to quote this supposed "insult".

The only person being antagonistic in this thread is you.

Given the tone you've taken since you became defensive for no good reason, I've been remarkably civil.
 

Karnath

Well-Known Member
#15
Admittedly insult perhaps was to strong of a word, dismissive of consoles would perhaps be better, and to get to the point of me not understanding that a physical copy doesn't guarantee you access to a game no mater what, I am aware of that I just prefer owning physical copies. I also don't primarily game on older consoles (though I do enjoy doing so occasionally), most of my current gaming is done on pc, Switch, or PS4 depending on the game style in question. I am also aware that my internet situation isn't normal, that being said there are a great many people in the States and Canada that have far more restricted internet then what you seem to have, my two choices for internet are limited wireless bandwidth or slow physical connection where downloading games takes quite a few hours and can see regular interruptions from something going wrong with the connection. If I came across as antagonistic these last few days I apologize, I had some personal things going on and some of how you worded things rubbed me the wrong way.

Now no offence but I honestly think that this conversation has gone on long enough, shall we just let bygones be bygones?
 

Contrabardus

Well-Known Member
#16
Admittedly insult perhaps was to strong of a word, dismissive of consoles would perhaps be better, and to get to the point of me not understanding that a physical copy doesn't guarantee you access to a game no mater what, I am aware of that I just prefer owning physical copies. I also don't primarily game on older consoles (though I do enjoy doing so occasionally), most of my current gaming is done on pc, Switch, or PS4 depending on the game style in question. I am also aware that my internet situation isn't normal, that being said there are a great many people in the States and Canada that have far more restricted internet then what you seem to have, my two choices for internet are limited wireless bandwidth or slow physical connection where downloading games takes quite a few hours and can see regular interruptions from something going wrong with the connection. If I came across as antagonistic these last few days I apologize, I had some personal things going on and some of how you worded things rubbed me the wrong way.

Now no offence but I honestly think that this conversation has gone on long enough, shall we just let bygones be bygones?
That's fine, but "dismissive" is also a strong word considering I acknowledged and agreed that there are legitimate reasons for console gaming over PC gaming and never said there was anything wrong with your preferences. I'm not going to say anything more than that regarding it.

Also, in my very first post I said "all things being equal". Your internet access situation alone immediately makes your situation not that.
 
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