What games are you playing 2: The revenge

Zetas

Lurking upon the deep
Been playing FF14's pre-release of Endwalker, the queues are horrible. It literally took me 5 hours to get on yesterday thanks to the games lobby server for my cluster having the ability to only handle 17000 people in queue at once, on the plus side if you got back in quick enough it would save your spot. It also doesn't help at all that Cactaur, the server i'm on, is the one that somehow attracted Vtubers and Asmongold, so the population is a bit passed capped.
 

chronodekar

Obsessively signs his posts
Staff member
I got Pathfinder:Kingmaker. Playing the game in turn-based mode. This is a surprisingly fun game! Compared with Pillars of Eternity 2, I am having a far easier time _following_ the flow of battle. What I mean by this, is that in Kingmaker, when its my turn to do anything, I can hover my mouse over the different lines in the battle log and actually _understand_ what is happening. There is a lot of the mathematics of Pathfinder I do not understand, but the equations are easy to follow. In fact, I'm half-thinking of getting the Pathfinder game books myself now.

Plot-so-far:
After character creation, we are called to a Lord's manor and asked to form a party/gang with a larger group of adventurers to capture some contested land. There is a big banquet happening, part way through the night, the place is attacked. We meet up with some of the adventurers and chase the assassins away. During these events, we meet The Backstabber. I forget his name, but he offers us some equipment during the attack which helps us. Then, before we can reach the Lord of the manor, he suggests we loot the armory - to get better gear to push off the intruders. After the Lord is finally rescued, he accuses us of wrongdoing. Which is the point at which I started to think of him as The Backstabber.

The Lord of the place, sadly, does not have enough evidence to decide between me or the Backstabber. As a compromise, she tells us to form 2 separate parties and venture out into the contested lands. The idea being, as we capture and build territory, it should become evident who the real villain is.

With a few companions, whose trust we gained during the recent fight, we set off towards an Inn. As we arrive, some bandits attack the place - whom we repel. A second wave of bandits attacks the place at night which we also repel.

At night, as we slept, a spirit/dryad approached us. There is some kind of strange mist in the area which is damaging the fauna/flora in addition to causing us to lose visibility. She asks us to stop the mist from growing. Sad bit is, she's not sure where the source of the mist is, but she points us to a bandit camp nearby to "interrogate". That's one quest. Another quest is that, via mysterious old men (or visions) I found where The Backstabber is. Am thinking of going after him first.

Moving along the world-map now.

-chronodekar
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
How to Date a Magical Girl

Breaking out the VNs again with a side of dating sims. Not a huge amount on the dating sim, though. Back to several straight shifts thanks to OT shifts again, so these are nice since I can play about an hour a day.

Anyways, the basic gist is you're a nearly-faceless male character in a magical girl academy, which very conveniently is built up at the start of the story to be post-high school, so everyone indeed is 18 or older. Five girls to date, with the game's calendar year starting in April and ending in what I presume to be December. I'm through September on a first blind run. There's a little bit of a deeper story narrative to go with it. There's at least three moments so far that I've counted in 6-ish hours so far where there's a 'glitch' effect like TV static. The main character's only known use of magic is freezing time around a falling object once, and a couple of characters very vaguely make comments about that the MC can 'always' change things, even after they've happened, so I'm guessing some sort of time-travel/dimensional-hopping/it's all a computer simulation/etc. twist in the end.

Basic gameplay is rather a lot like the standard bogs for these games. You get two actions a day to either upgrade your stats, go out with the girls, or commit to a few miscellaneous things like exploring for alchemy ingredients and making potions. Though they're very much two entirely different genres, the easiest thing I would compare it to is Persona, where you'll normally have an afternoon action and an evening action. What's annoying is that there are lots of days where the game skips one or both free actions, forcing you to bed and moving the calendar again, and at one point it does this for twenty days in a single month! I've no doubt that it's doing this to force scarcity of actions to beef up your stats and relationship values, but it's way too obvious.
 
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seitora

Well-Known Member
How to Date a Magical Girl

I cleared the game running a Hikari route. The ending plot twist went roughly about what I predicted.

The ending was a massive let-down. There's a bad ending, which is OK. The 'good' ending, however, has practically zero payoff. You make your good ending choice, there's about two or three more minutes of text, and that's it. Quite frankly, I'm baffled. The storywriters set up a game that's roughly 8 hours long, and then it's just exit stage right in a matter of a few minutes?

Do not recommend. I'll probably do a quick run to clear out my achievements, and that's that.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
How to Date a Magical Girl

Finished up all four other character routes. It's easy to clear them all on a single run, as long as you're aware of the mechanics ahead of time and can plan it out a little bit.
 

Zetas

Lurking upon the deep
Finished the MSQ for Endwalker about an hour ago and oh what a ending to a wonderful and strange trip.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
A Magical High School Girl

I had this on my Steam list from...somewhere? So playing it.

Game is mostly a rogue-lite of the turn-based grid-movement type. You pick up items that you can use to either heal your magic bar or health, or buff up your stats, or get rid of status effects. Spells follow a little bit of an elemental system, and can be straight projectile, toss into the air to go over obstacles like hedges, or bomb-type attacks that hit a large area all around your character. Attacks can have some extra characteristics, like piercing projectiles that can go through multiple enemies in a row, or insta-kill.

I'm using a keyboard, and it has the typical WASD keys for Japanese doujinsoft games, along with some ZXC usage. It gets a little annoying, because somehow the controls just aren't quite 'clicking' for me yet, so I lose a few turns trying to swap spells and instead accidentally use the one I have on hand.

Something interesting is that you can actually 'name' custom spells, and the system is supposed to build a spell effect and power based off the name. So Fireball would give you a fire-element projectile. In practice, you're probably better off just finding a list of spells somebody else has written down, because spells vary in MP cost and power, so you can basically find a spell with peak efficiency instead.

One thing that's a little weird is the HP/MP set-up. You cast spells from your MP bar, and most items will heal MP, and walking around restores MP. When you get hit by monsters, your MP bar goes down first. You only have a very small amount of HP (I start out with 3), and the HP also reduces into fractional counts, too. As you walk around, your HP slowly starts to drop as a sort of stamina effect. Hits by monsters will empty your MP bar out, and it's only after you are out of MP that they deplete your HP. The higher your HP, the quicker your MP replenishes when walking around. HP healing items are a lot rarer, too. No instadeath, though you lose all your items and start out on the first floor (starting from the second level, you only need to do the first two floors and then you can skip to the highest multiple of 4 floor you've reached, ie. floor 4, 8, 12, 16, etc.)

Story is bare-bones. A witch turns a high school girl into a witch herself, and she has to battle her way through a maze every day.
 
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"I don't remember sucking this much when I played the original." - Me, during a 20-minute attempt of Final Fantasy VIII Remastered

I'll note that I was deliberately playing it "old-school" fashion, with random encounters turned on and "maximum levels cheat button" off.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
A Magical High School Girl

And finished the game.

The mechanics take a little bit to figure out, since it's not all that well-explained.

Each floor was basically use a map-revealing spell, then move around delicately, clearing out monsters and avoiding getting ganged up. I mostly used straight projectiles, usually piercing projectiles. Very rarely would I use anything like a bomb or 3x3 or 4x4 attack. Some, but not all of the time, I would use speed-up magic before running into an enemy, which gives me two actions per turn for four turns. The other thing I might have used, though more rarely, is a Protect + Counter spell, which halves damage against Akari and reflects the damage done to her against the monster.

There was a run of floors (the last 10 floors in the game) where I was running into several enemies that were very difficult to damage, either because they were only weak to one type of attack or because they had high defense. At this point, I just started using Teleport to warp myself around the map, and rush for the exit.

The first boss in the game requires a spell that can cause Blind, and after that you can use projectiles. The second and third boss are a little trickier with projectiles, but a combination of high-healing items and using speed-up spells and protect + counter spells to give myself lots more actions than the boss made them not too bad. You need to bring a few items that cure Silence in to the third boss. The impression I get from the Steam boards is that lots of people wiped out. I never did, but I got killed lots more on the regular dungeon crawling because of endless amounts of floors and monsters.

There are equippable weapons, called Crosses. The ones I use most of the game are the ones that either reduce MP usage for specific element spells, or increase the power of specific element spells. The other extremely useful one is the Benevolence Crosse, which triples the amount of MP I can heal using a spell that uses my HP. Not too useful in the early game, but huge by late-game. There are also Badges, which are basically permanent equips that give certain effects. Useful ones are the badges that give you an extra HP (I was able to get 2 total badges for 5 HP. Not certain if there is a hard limit), and the one that gives you two extra pages of extra items. They're all useful, really, but the aforementioned two are the most useful off-hand. Especially the one that gives you two extra pages of item capacity, because I constantly ran out of room at 4 pages, but 6 pages was a breeze.

There is an in-game shop, but unlike the stores in most games, this one doesn't have a set inventory. So sometimes you'll only really be able to buy garbage, and sometimes you can buy some really useful items like the above Badges. It took me until just before the 3rd boss that I got the extra items Badge.

Anyways. I don't recommend this game. 10 hours to finish the game.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Rakuen

This is one of those indie RPG Maker puzzle-adventure games that leans heavily on a story premise dealing with mental health, some degree of parallel worlds, the overlap between the two, and the exploration of the human condition. Like a few dozen other games before it, To The Moon being the most famous. Fortunately, it does this fairly well with a very upbeat vibe. Even though some of the characters helped don't have their physical condition resolved and will presumably be in a mental morass, those around them are able to move on.

There is a lot of lovely pixel work in the game for the backgrounds. Some baller music, too. Something that's kind of neat, at least to me, is how quickly the music changes as you travel through the area of Rakuen that the majority of the game's real exploration and puzzles occur in. Sometimes I only go through one room and it changes again, and usually two or three, as most areas of the map have their own separate track. The developer(s) could have easily just had a tiny handful of tracks to cover the entire game, and didn't.

Just finished the third out of five song segments.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Rakuen

Finished the game. It ended up feeling just slightly underwhelming to me, though it's still definitely an amazing experience. Possibly that may be because it follows in the same footsteps as To the Moon and Finding Paradise, so it doesn't quite have the same oomph pioneering something new. The last couple of hours feel like they needed fleshed out a little more, and some story details more outright stated, instead of trying to keep everything very lightly implied. There's also a glaring historical inaccuracy that I'm guessing 95% of people who play the game would never be aware of, but I am, and it does tarnish the story a little bit to me, as it feels like a cheap shot for tugging some heartstrings.

But on the all, I definitely enjoyed it!

The scene with Sue at the end of her song segment, visiting all her planets, was absolutely amazing.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Kotodama: The 7 Mysteries of Fujisawa

Yet another one of those D-tier VNs that I had on my Steam backlog. Unlike some of the other D-tier VNs I've played, this one didn't have a half-baked story, which already sets it a little bit above.

Due to story reasons, you have to do at least two full playthroughs of the game. This may have been tolerable in itself, except for one very sore point...the 'skip read text' option? In this instance, it doesn't work. Sure, if you do a subsequent third full playthrough, it'll work. But in the second playthrough, it'll ignore everything you've already seen and force you to re-read through every line of text. If you want to collect everything in the game, there's at least a minimum third playthrough, and possibly a fourth too to acquire a bad ending.

To get the best ending, there are a few chapters where you have to visit certain locations in a specific order to correctly progress. Good luck without trial-and-error or a guide! I have no desire to test, but I think it's also possible to screw yourself by selecting the true ending and saving over your save right after. I don't think you can do another loop again after a true ending, so you would have to start an entirely new save file from scratch that doesn't have all your collectibles.

There is a time-travel element to the game, which is why the subsequent forced second playthrough. Despite this, the protagonist barely ever makes mention of his time travel knowledge for internal commentary on events. Oh, there are lines there. They're just very infrequent.

Anyways, the crown jewel is that progression in the game is hidden behind...a connect 3 game. Yeah, seriously. I haven't played HuniePop at all, which is presumably similar in that concept, but this concept 3 game can get a little infuriating at times. It's not a straightforward connect 3 game, and after a while, the game starts requiring increasingly better scores that might be tight to the wire. Fortunately, in the second playthrough, you can start to pick up items that make these games much easier.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Karakara

This is a VN that takes place in a post-apocalyptic setting. Despite that, it's a lot more slice-of-life than it is a trying-to-survive storyline, but that's the setting it chose to go with. Maybe so it had the excuse to throw in catgirls and bunnygirls as an excuse of post-apocalyptic experiments so the human race could survive. The main character runs a diner, with his two (female) hanger-ons.

The game has two separate 'chapters' to it in-story, each running about an hour of reading each.

On a separate note, am I so glad I got all of these VNs that I keep going through for like a dollar each in Humble Bundles or something over the years. The regular price on a lot of these games are $10+, which is a terrible, terrible 'bargain' for something that isn't very deep and runs at two hours of reading. It also means I probably have about 20-odd more of these games to run through, too. They're easy to knock out of my Steam backlog, which for some reason I'm utterly fixated on decreasing the size of currently.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Head AS Code

This is a VN that is basically summed up as a trapped location escape room killing game, very much in the purview of the Zero Escape games (and Danganronpa, to a much lesser extent). The rules in the killing game actually don't require killing at all, but of course that's how they will always end up. Much like the Zero Escape games, there's multiple branching paths that you can take as you choose which escape rooms to solve, progressing the plot in different ways, and bad endings galore that each contribute a little more to the overall puzzle. Much like the Zero Escape games, I'm of course expecting the obligatory end-game mindscrew.

The 'trapped location' in this place is a riff on the Montreal train system. There isn't very much payoff to why it has to be Montreal (so far?), but it's a little more interesting dynamic, because characters get to different puzzle rooms by taking a literal train. Of course, there's still no way out of the entire underground. What's kind of neat is that the routes flowchart literally looks like a set of intersecting train lines and train stations.

Now, this is basically one person scripting and writing most of the game, so it's got lots of flaws. One is that the story and characters aren't anywhere near as sophisticated and polished as they could be with a few scriptwriters brainstorming. Plot twists are kind of just dropped in out of thin air. The bigger one is that where Zero Escape had puzzle rooms, this game...doesn't. Yeah, you get into escape rooms that you have to get out from, but what it really boils down to is 'point and click at about a dozen different objects in the room before the story progresses', as opposed to outright dynamic puzzles. There's I think only two rooms I've seen where you actually have to solve something.

I would say I'm probably...two-thirds done so far? That's what it feels like to me, pacing-wise.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Head AS Code

Completed. Ten hours on the dot, outside of one achievement I mention in a few paragraphs.

There was the obligatory mindscrew at the end of the game, as I was expecting. As I mentioned earlier, though, the story needed some polishing. Some of the stuff that helps set up the mindscrew was only introduced a few story segments earlier, so some more significant foreshadowing would have helped.

There was...one extra puzzle that I can think of, off the top of my head? So three or four in the game, and they're all basically 'point and click at items in a specific order' puzzles.

Also, there's a sort of interesting achievement, where you have to do a save file, and get the True ending with the bare minimum of endings leading up to it. There are 19 endings. The True Ending counts as 1, and the first ending in any playthrough doesn't allow you to make any choices, so you always get the same ending. So you basically have to get 7/17 remaining endings, and only those. None of the bad endings that don't lead anywhere. Fortunately, when I did this, I was able to skip read text. Which is as it should be.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Spirit Hunter: NG

I played through the first game, Death Mark, a year and change ago. Finally getting to this game. Note that NG isn't a direct sequel. This takes place ~5 years after Death Mark, just before the turn of the millenium (July - August 1999. There are a few occasional mentions of the millennium change and the Y2K). There are a few references to the characters of Death Mark, but they are kept short and out-of-the-way.

Anyways. I'm through the first 3 chapters (counting the Screaming Author as the third chapter, and the first little bit with Yuri as a prologue).

The overall premise of this game is that the protagonist gets infected by an occult curse. To ward it off, in each chapter of the game, he has to hunt down a spirit while with a partner, investigate the spirit's background, and then encounter it in the chapter finale. Here, you either purify it or destroy it. Purifying usually means to 'empathise' with what caused the spirit's creation and put it to rest, while destroying it basically overloads its grudge until it blows up. Destroying will lead to your partner's death, and eventually to an overall story bad end.

The game is very much like a virtual novel in its construction, but with a large exploration and point-and-click element to it. You explore multiple rooms in each area to find out more about the local spirit. The final battle is always a turn-based style fight where you use items you've found through the chapter and your knowledge of the spirit to ward it off and then vanquish it.

There is a moderate amount of jump scares in the game, though only a few of them are truly in-your-face, while the rest are brief ghost images in the background, or occasional haunting noises...this is, of course, assuming you want the jump scares and noises. There's a setting to toggle the jump scares between a normal amount, a 'Scary Mode' amount, and none at all. I went with Scary Mode and got a few scares, but Scary Mode seems to be just about what Death Mark had with no mode setting at all.

The game's visual style has that weird sort of pastel tone that a lot of horror game visuals go for. This will be a weird tangent, but that visual is one of the very few times where something made in Japan has character art that actually look Japanese to a Western view. There's a moderate amount of 'gothic' visuals, too.

Now, some comparisons to Spirit Hunter: Death Mark...this game doesn't explicitly call them 'Live or Die' sequences, but instead have a 'WARNING' label to start it off. At certain parts, you will be given a multiple-choice sequence, sometimes with multiple choices back-to-back, where you need to select the correct choice(s) or it's game over. The Live or Die sequences feel significantly weaker here than in Death Mark. The first reason is that some of the 'correct' answers just feel completely nonsensical. Death Mark had a few in its 4th chapter that required some science knowledge, but I've wiped out so many times in NG because the correct answer is almost completely a wild guess. Secondly, there's a countdown timer going from 1000 to 0. If you hit 0, it's a game over as well. In Death Mark, sometimes a wrong choice would merely knock the timer down by 500 all at once, so you could afford to get one bad choice on a run. In NG, basically every bad choice ends the sequence immediately.

The bosses also suffer a little bit from this. Death Mark had some more intuitive solutions for fighting the bosses. Some of the fights here were a lot more trial-and-error.

The exploration sequences are also weaker. Death Mark mostly had larger rooms that could be 10-20 rooms for the most part. What I've seen of NG so far is around 5 rooms at a time.

Finally, there are a few points in the game where it's possible to run into roadblocks if you don't have much knowledge of Japanese culture. Death Mark had one such point in the 5th chapter. It occurs a few times here, too. I sorely wish a translating outfit in this day and age would try to make puzzles a little easier when this happens.

As for things that are better? Definitely far-better developed characters, mostly since NG keeps a tighter roster of characters. NG also introduces the (presumed) final boss right away, unlike Death Mark, who spices the narrative up a lot.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Spirit Hunter: NG

Finished the game, doing its 'good ending' which requires you purify each of the first four spirits, as opposed to destroying any of them.

Definitely a lot more story-driven than Death Mark is, but the exploration segments for sure felt weaker. I guess it only feels a little less 'scary' when most locations are relatively sanitised urban settings, and only the haunted house and department store really have that vibe. I will say though, props to that Jingle Bells song in the department store. Great atmosphere-setting for the final exploration segment, like the Japanese military songs in chapter 5 of the original game.

I had a save right before Killer Peach, so I was able to get the Normal Ending. Looking at the Bad Ending requirements, though...gah. Far as I can tell, there isn't anything like a skip read text or fast text option, so it'll be a lot of me putting the game on automatic for 10-15 minutes at a time and doing exploration segments from time to time.

On a different note, while I like that NG borrows a lot of the music from Death Mark, it feels like it could have added some more new stuff in.

I guess there was at least one Live or Die sequence where the wrong choice would merely knock off 500 from the timer instead of instadeath...the optional vending machine sequence if you chose to save Hazuki in a route where both her and Amanome survive the first two chapters.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Spirit Hunter: NG

Finished the Bad Ending, and with that, the game. That was a chore. I really wish there was a skip-read-text option so I can skip the stuff I've already read and see the stuff new to this specific route.

Doing a little bit of reading, there's a few things that I'm missing if I do another couple of plays. There's at least one CG with Amanome running with him from chapter 3 onwards, and there's a bad ending with Rose. But given just how many more chapters I would have to replay to get those bits, I will pass on that and likely just watch it on YouTube instead.
 
LiEat

LiEat is a set of three short, episodic games that run about an hour each for the first two, and about an hour and a half for the last. They're all fairly interconnected and continuous, just with a time gap in between. It's a top-down 2D pixel game with a focus on story and some exploration, and a minimal amount of an RPG battle system in there. Each game follows stumbling upon a new area and solving the 'mystery' of that area. Combat is definitely nothing to write home about, but fairly easy once you figure it out in the first game, with easy healing spots nearly everywhere.

The story tells the character of Efina, nicknamed 'Efi', who is a 'lie-eating dragon' that was just born, and appears as a four-year-old girl, and her caretaker, a con artist who changes names and appearances every game. Dragons in these games...aren't, really. They're basically glorified humans who can manifest horns and wings, are capable of using magic, and at least in their early years hit fast growth spurts (Efi at 6 months appears 4 years old, and at 9 months looks 5 years old. A dragon later introduced to be 9 years old appears late teenage age). Her caretaker, although a con artist, isn't really a bad guy. Exploration segments will vary between one of them at a time, then both of them at the same time.

The story does have that fairy-tale whimsy to it, even with some modern-day devices like cell phones, which is really essential. Without that whimsy, the games fall flat, but with it, it absolutely works. Efi is definitely a cute character, and everyone loves her.

These games were made around 2014, which is the really surprising part to me. While pixel art is in vogue again, the pixel art on this looks so basic I honestly thought it was something from the early 90s. There are occasional 'cutscenes', which are usually pixel stills very slightly animated, but those and the title screens/ending cutscenes are about the only thing that are a moderate step up over the rest of the game.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Hyperdimension Neptunia Rebirth;2

I played the first Rebirth game about a year ago, so here I am, back with the sequel.

The sequel feels a little easier than the first game. I think there are two reasons for that. First off, I seem to be levelling at a more brisk pace. I was able to get the Super EXP Up plan crafted and toggled on extremely quick (I think after the first dungeon? Since all it requires is Dogoo Jelly), while I think the EXP up plan in the first game was a little more involved process that I couldn't get it until later (EDIT: Oh wait, Super EXP Up is part of a DLC package. Was there not one from the first game's DLC?). The second reason is that the battle system is basically a straight one-to-one carryover from the previous game. Since I am aware of all the little extra things that help add up damage and firepower, I can more easily blow through the early game when all that extra damage makes things move much more quickly.

What is nice is that I am in that little happy spot for grinding. I don't have to do very much grinding, and what little I do grind, the UI moves quickly and intuitively enough that I never get frustrated.

I just finished Chapter 2, with about 8 hours of game time. It took me a little bit before I realised that the story is more of a soft reboot of the first game using the same characters and setting, rather than a direct sequel. Nepgear is...kind of boring? She's not dislikable, but she doesn't have character progression, and simply doesn't have the kind of chirpy, self-referential humour to carry a conversation the way that Neptune does.

Also in relation to the first game, I feel like there's more dungeons being thrown my way than the first game. Not that it really means much on the part of the developers, since just about every dungeon uses a stock background and setting and just changes up the floor area a little bit. But it does feel like I'm moving to different dungeons more frequently. I cannot remember what the EXE Drive was like in the first game, however. Did it reset every time you left a dungeon? I don't think it did, but I could be wrong. It is a little bit of a chore having to rebuild my EXE drive every time I go to a new dungeon, just to be able to get the EXE attacks again at the end of each combination.
 
So I downloaded Pokemon Master's EX. Can I just say how disappointing it is that a mobile game has Voice Acting before even a single mainline game? Also, disappointed they didn't get Brock or Misty's original VA's back...

This also brings the total number of Gatcha games I'm playing up to 6.
 
Geezus, i'm only playing with two and i barely have the time to keep up with them.
To be fair, with Genshin and Epic Seven I'm just logging in to do my dailies, Konosuba I just login for the login bonus, since I'm not interested in the current event, so I'm mainly playing DisgaeaRPG and Fate/Grand Order. The gameplay for Pokemon Master's EX seems pretty good at the moment, still need to learn a good chunk of the mechanics though.

I also still have King's Raid and Pokemon Go on my phone, but I haven't touched either in months.
 
Hyperdimension Neptunia Rebirth;2

Finished up to chapter 5. The last 3 chapters passed much quicker than the first 2, especially chapter 4, which I think was a single dungeon run to the Gamindusti Graveyard. Not a whole lot to comment on that. Late in chapter 5, I started chipping away at getting dungeon change plans and add enemies plans completed. The last boss battle in chapter 5 drops a Flash Chip, which is required for I think the Severed Dungeon Add Enemies, which after a few chains of enemy drops and dungeon plans, allows me to get the Limit Breaker plan unlocked. When I do the inevitable NG+, it'll make it a lot easier to mop the floors with some bosses.

Let's see, what else. Without doing the dungeon change plans, I was getting surprisingly few modules for my chip items. Now that I'm doing runs again on dungeon upgrades for more monster drops, now I'm finally getting Level 3s, Level 4s, and Level 5s. I'm not entirely happy that a moderate amount of content is either locked away or just more easily gotten by doing the Stella's Dungeon runs. Fortunately, the one DLC helps keep the frustration down, since I don't lose any items by having the DLC plan. I just don't 'complete' a dungeon sometimes, and of course they all need to be cleared for an Achievement.
 
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