What games are you playing 2: The revenge

seitora

Well-Known Member
and played the sequel to the above, Fault Milestone Two. I got it from the same Humble Bundle I assume.

It runs pretty much the same plot beats as the first game. The party gets to a new country, learns a little bit about the local culture and politics, then encounter a random couple of characters with problems that the party helps resolve. Unlike the first game, this one doesn't even have a token choice that you can make in the middle of the game. The narrative for the entire series seems really weird, unless it's supposed to lead up to an unusual type of field education for Selphine the princess' royal education. The short, episodic nature of this series doesn't look very well-done...especially when this game released in 2016, and the sequel will supposedly be released later this year, in 2021. They're only bite-sized chunks of stories practically, about 4 hours each of reading.

There was one amusing part, where the presumed main antagonist of the series showed up at the beginning and launched an attack so powerful it forces an automatic application quit and restart ala Undertale.
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Bouncing around again. Playing Root Double - Before Crime * After Days - Xtend Edition. Whew, what a mouthful of a title.

So the game is a VN, with what looks like a lot of inspiration from 999 (this was released in 2012, 999 was released in 2009). While there aren't any investigation segments, it loosely follows the same scenario of '9 characters trapped in a dangerous area that they have to survive'. Both casts of characters were even designed using the enneagram, though this game flat-out shoves it in your face with a pseudo-diagram wheel that you adjust throughout the game to select which character to agree with at branch choices, or whether to doubt or trust a lone character at spots. Some choices are essentially meaningless, while others can lead to a death ending.

I'm about 9 hours of playtime, somewhere in chapter 5 on the A route. The game very vaguely gives hints here and there to what is broadly happening, so I have a few theories, though they're all in very diverging directions that I can't narrow anything down much.

A few things that I had expected to happen that didn't. I would have thought the group would preserve their AD pills early on while the radiation was still fairly low, and early in chapter 5, when Ukita interrogates Watase for proof about him having amnesia, I would have thought they'd use one of the machines in the neuroscience laboratory that they're literally standing in at that moment to scan his brain for swelling or something. Which didn't happen. Maybe it'll happen later.

Also, this game was released in 2012, and the setting of the game is 2030. This image is hilarious.

 

Jimbobob5536

Well-Known Member
Currently playing the Demon's Souls remake.
Also the Tales of Arise demo over and over while I wait for the 10th.
 

chronodekar

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Tales of Arise has been on my "interested" list for a long time. Am going to wait for reviews though, before buying.

I got my hands on Ace Attorney: Great Detective. Wait, no, its called something else; ummm "The Great Ace Attorney: Chronocles". They release it on PC, which is where I'm playing it on.

The "relationship" to the mainline Ace Attorney games is that you play as the ancestor of Phonix Wright. The game takes place around the time of the industrial revolution and considers the Sherlock Holmes stories to be canon. As I understand it, they called him that in the Japanese release, but for licensing reasons, in the official English release, he's called "Herlock Scholmes". I find it funny.

The Chronocles edition consists of 2 of the 3DS games. I'm playing the first one, have done 3 cases. The first 2 cases were fun. The first one felt like it had segments where it dragged on a bit, but to be fair, that happened for the second one too. By dragged on, I mean something new pops up, changing our understanding of events and we need a lot of exposition/courtroom-drama to figure things out.

The 3rd case was just bizarre. You are asked to defend a .... man of questionable integrity. Am not going to spoil things, but I have the feeling that the point of the case was to question what the point of the courts is. Or more specifically, what the point of a lawyer is. Perhaps others find that fun, but me? I don't. I like the courtroom battles of the original Ace Attorney DS games and don't really like the exchanges we have where the system itself is questioned. Feels like crossing a boundary that I don't want to cross.

The game *is* fun. I'll give them that. Am currently investigating the 4th case (there's a total of 5, I think).

-chronodekar
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Root Double - Before Crime * After Days - Xtend Edition

Playing through, there's definitely very strong 999 correlations here in some ways. Given this game was published in 2012, I wonder how much was inspired by 999, and how much is just coincidental. Still, given it's a straight up VN without any real interaction like 999 had with its Escape rooms, it's definitely weaker overall.

So I got through the rest of the A route. I got I think 6 seperate bad death endings, and then the story ending I got was an ending, but definitely not a good ending. Only Watase escapes and he's gone crazy and is stuck in his own mind. Mashiro is the only one whose body wasn't found before the end of this route. I'll probably do one more run and mess around, before I go to a guide to figure out the good ending.

After my 'normal' ending, I went to the B route for the time being. The B route is a lot more straightforward, with what appears to be no real branching paths. This makes a more linear route. Nominally, the B route takes place at the same time as the A route, but thus far, it's been in media res instead, looking at the school days of its three main characters for the 6 days prior to the meltdown.

Thus far, I've gotten through the first 3 days of the B route.

So part of the setting of the game is that a very small subsection of humanity (1 in 30000) has a specific gene that allows them to use telepathy, with an even rarer amount able to read minds, and the town that the game is set in is designated as a special city where a lot of telepaths live so it's 1 in 500 in town. In the A route this is barely brought up from time to time, but in the B route it's pivotal, since the four characters on the B route are all telepaths. The game uses a pseudo-scientific explanation of it being through a newly discovered elementary particle that the telepathic part of the brain can transmit and receive, which is colloquially referred to as information in matter form.

So, a lot of theory-crafting that I've put in spoilers.

There's a few plot elements that stick out in my mind leading up to a theory for the B route. 9 years ago, Natsuhiku, the male protagonist of this route, and one of his female friends, Yuuri, snuck into the nuclear research lab building where the main A route takes place in, and apparently got stuck in a nuclear lockdown situation. In the modern day, the characters get stuck in a redux of this situation, but Yuuri is triggering Natsuhiko to remember the previous 6 days in media res in exact detail while going through the nuclear lab, not just bits of details. Basically trying to get him to overcome some personality funks. Meanwhile, during those 6 days, there's some background material dropped that suggests that the idea of ghosts in folklore can be explained as telepaths leaving behind strong doses of information elementary particles. Finally, there's several bits talking about visual blind spots, the brain having blind spots, the brain filling things in and rationalising discrepancies, etc. So I'm going to guess that Yuuri actually died 9 years prior, but she left behind an enormously powerful burst of information particles that convinces at least Natsuhiko and possibly his friends and family that she's still alive to the current day, and the present day will be to help him self-actualise and get over his guilt for leading her to her doom 9 years ago since he was the one who convinced her to sneak in with him. It's also possible that it's Natsuhiko who's the dead person instead, just because I've read enough pseudo-scific VNs that I expect a plot twist like that.

However, Yuuri also appears on the A route, which takes place at the same time as the B route does, but on opposite ends of the building. Watase, the protagonist of A route, at one point sees her dead, but when he brings everyone else to her body, her corpse is gone, and there's no blood splatter. Meanwhile, when they find a surveillance camera log, where he thinks he stopped to see her corpse, he actually just walked right by. So yeah, I'm inclined to believe Yuuri is dead still in this case, but somehow her deathbed telepathy is affecting Watase too. Possibly he did something to kill her in the past, or he saved Natsuhiko in the past but had to let Yuuri die because he could only save one but not the other. I don't have that much information yet to more concretely theorise.

Oh, so there's also an implication that there's no actual nuclear reactor in the lab building, but throughout the A route, people suffer occasional symptoms of radiation sickness when they go too long without their AD pills, which are magical fictional radiation-blocking pills that can block external radiation for up to one hour. The easiest solution here is that it's the power of suggestion causing people to think they have radiation, but not. That's too easy though. With the setting of powerful telepaths, I think it's that somebody is mentally influencing everybody to believe the radiation is increasing, and making their bodies think they have radiation poisoning when they've missed an AD pill. The final possibility goes back to the above about how telepathy in this setting transmits using actual elementary particles...radiation in the dangerous sense comes from higher-energy EM waves, sometimes caused by particle decay. If there's multiple telepaths stuck in a closed-in building with lead walls to prevent radiation from escaping, where at least two of them are suggested to be extremely powerful telepaths, I wouldn't be surprised if their telepathic activity itself was driving up background radiation through elementary particle action, and nobody is the wiser.

I guess I'll have to see how much of what I guessed turns out to be correct after I play further.
 

chronodekar

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I finished the 4th case of The Great Ace Attorney Chronocles. This is by far my most favorite case. It's a murder accusation - multiple witnesses saw the accused walked alongside the victim and then suddenly, the victim collapsed with the accused running away from the scene. As the defendant ... it's a bad situation.

The romantic in me liked watching the couples in the case bicker with each other. There are 2 of them. One you meet during the investigative segment and the other during the trial.

The first challenge of the case was breaking apart the prosecution's assertion that only the accused could have done it. The prosecutor admits that they did not find any motive for the crime (alleged crime - this is technically not a murder because the victim didn't die ... yet; she's in medical care, but in critical condition).

Cross examining the first witness does not do anything good. The jury is unanimously convinced and we (the player) need to pit them against each other. Finally, we get the chance to hear from the actual witnesses - I really liked them. A married couple named Pat and Roly ( the latter is a London policeman).

About 3/4th way through, when we are doing the second jury challenge, is when a hint of a potential explanation to the case opens up. It is brought up in a moment of what I consider comedy, but played straight that it becomes a tragedy.

Then comes a twist involving a window. That took me some time to puzzle out. But it was *very* satisfying to do so!

An excellent 4th case!

-chronodekar
 

seitora

Well-Known Member
Root Double - Before Crime * After Days - Xtend Edition


I finished the B route. I went back to finish the A route. Surprisingly, I was only a single choice away from the good ending.

So I got the whole 'Yuuri = dead' thing right. Not a big surprise. It could be that her dying somehow increased Natsuhiko's telepathy potential, since it was said to have increased. It still doesn't explain her presence in the After route, though.

I'm going to sort of revise a theory I had about the radiation inside the building, by actually putting together two separate theories. The first is that the telepaths are driving up the radiation, but also that the 'WX particle amplifiers' that have been mentioned a few times are the machines in Area N, and they project the same particles that are used for telepathy in this setting. If they're literal particle amplifiers, then the particles are presumably highly energised and ionised, so it's radiation-but-not-really.

Something sort of interesting I've noticed is that Watase sees himself as having a head full of anime-green hair, but from Natsuhiko's perspective, Watase has a single grey lock. Probably something to do with the whole theme about the brain filtering out and rejecting some information and substituting a reality of its own.

There's the subject of who the unknown dead girl killed by the cargo lift is. Given my earlier theory of Yuuri projecting telepathy onto Natsuhiko after death, I'm going to assume the dead girl was a test subject at the facility, killed by somebody before she could escape. Presumably Ukita. As a powerful telepath, she also projected telepathy after death, but hers was a lot more hateful, so once everyone starts to doubt each other, she's affecting their moods into killing each other.

I assume Salyu killed everyone else in the facility besides the dead girl. The other traitor Sirius workers, and presumably researchers who may have been in cahoots. It's mentioned one of the dead people had their fingers broken backwards, so maybe that same above hate telepathy.
 
Because I apparently have a gambling addiction, I've now picked up a fourth Gatcha Game. So I'm now playing FGO, Epic Seven, Genshin Impact, and now KonoSuba Fantastic Days.

Although to be fair, all I'm really doing is replacing King's Raid with KonoSuba...
 

chronodekar

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Finished the 5th (and last) case of TGAAC (part 1) as well as the first case of the second game.

For those unfamiliar, The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles consists of 2 games that were originally only released in Japan on the 3DS. The newly released chronicles bundles them both into a single package.

The last case had its difficult moments. Parts of the story were more about social manipulation and less about finding inconsistencies in testimony. It's fun, but not my cup of tea. The character you play, Naruhodo actually witnesses a part of the events - this makes catching the mistakes made by some of the villains easy. But there is a mastermind behind it all - he shows up, but is really, REALLY hard to pin down. Simply put, the guy plays dirty - really dirty. The courtroom drama is as much about information flow as it is about matching evidence with testimony. At a later point, we catch the big bad in a lie. That's good. Then comes the mind-tumbling bit of tracing WHEN the damn fellow learned things. How could he possibly have learnt/heard about certain events, if he claimed to never have been around?

All in all, a fun experience. There *are* some plot points which are not resolved, but well, I've been told that game-2 answers them.

TGAAC-2 starts us off playing the role of Susato, Naruhodo's assistance from the first game. She's back in Japan and needs to defend her friend who is accused of murder. A ... problem with the time-period the game takes place in is that females were not allowed to be attorneys back then. So, she disguises herself as a male and the game goes on from there.

Remember the tutorial prosecutor from the other Ace Attorney games? Well, his ancestor is here in this game too and a humor is made of the poor fellows balding head. :)

A surprise at the end of the case is that professor Mikotoba knows the judge. I expect this to play into some of the unresolved plot points from the first game.

A pleasant surprise is the return of Soseki. You have to pity the fellow's luck at finding bad situations to be caught in, but he *is* a friendly fellow to be with. If, just, very excitable. :D

-chronodekar
 

chronodekar

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I finished the 2nd case and am about half-way through the 3rd.

The 2nd case brings back poor Mr. Natsume (the accused of the 4th case in the first game). Chronologically, this takes place _the_next_night_ after he gets acquitted. Terrible luck for the fellow. He immediately leaves the country after its all over.

What is rather unusual is that his second accusation is for attempted murder. You see, during the investigation, in the presence of police officers, we actually witness the "victim" come back to life! Turns out not enough poison was used to kill the fellow. I can't find an online video of it, but that scene was spectacular!

Now, a question arises, what were the victim and accused doing together? Turns out, they were having an English literary debate about Romeo and Juliet - who is stronger? It is exactly as ridiculous as it sounds. Thankfully it was not the focus of the case, but the expressions of everyone in the courtroom on hearing that was just funny/incredible!

Near the beginning of the trial, we expose someone of illegally stealing gas - the stuff used for heating houses, cooking on stoves ... etc. It was a silly distraction to the real case, but a very fun one! I truly enjoyed it!

And then, near the end, we figure out that the "victim" was planning some nefarious activities of his own - talking too much is spoiler territory, but the entire situation is just bizarre.

A good case.

Near the end, we discover some treasure. Which appears to be connected to a larger narrative related with Sherlock Holmes. After seeing the treasure, he asks Iris *not* to publish this adventure, which presumably is why we don't see it mentioned in the first game.

As the 3rd case opens, we meet up with Gina Lestrade - who's joined Scotland Yard! That was a surprise to me. Turns out that Holmes pulled a few strings to convince them to take her in. There was a very curious segment involving Madame Tussades wax museum. She's an attractive lady in this game. Turns out, someone was stealing/kidnapping wax statues. Why? And for what reason? No idea. I have a feeling it will come into play with the current case - a scientist is accused of murder, but the fellow wants the charge dropped to accident. A demonstration of his invention got a person killed. Sad affair - but the court drama is still ongoing!

-chronodekar
 

chronodekar

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I finished the 3rd case.

The case is about a teleportation experiment going wrong. Yes, you read that right - someone in the 18th century, invented teleportation - well before electricity was a thing! To be fair, it was supposed to be the first "unveiling" of its kind. A scientist was hoping to get government funding for his project, decides to make a public demonstration by teleporting his sponsor to another location. It goes wrong and we discover the sponsor's dead body at the other location. The scientist is blamed for the fiasco and we need to defend him.

Things start out comically - I was not sure what we were doing in the trial. On one hand our defendant is accused of murder. On the other hand, the fellow appears fine with it, as long as his hypothesis is proven correct - heck, there is at least one cross-examination where he's actually trying to prove his hypothesis, but if we allow it to stand, he'll be convicted of murder. Worst part? If the idiot just kept shut, the prosecution would not have any evidence about the situation!

During the case, it becomes apparent that shenanigans were afoot. Remember the sponsor who died? He has a reputation of being a gang-boss and generally unsavory fellow. Unknown to our poor scientist, there were background affairs to well, trick everyone into thinking that teleportation happened when in reality, the good old use-a-dummy switch-e-roo was taking place.

At one point in the case, we need to showcase a wax dummy. What we have in our court record (inventory) is *only* the head of the dummy. I was stumped at what to do and then, during a moment of save-scumming, show-cased the head, which magically bloated into the entire thing!

There is another point where we think that anti-gravity is activated in a particular room. I was kindof hoping that the room was somehow flipped about - but sadly, that did not happen. :(

The very, *very* last cross-examination stretched the bounds of my imagination. I needed to use a walk-through for the final 3 choices. It left me with a feeling that something was missing. Oddly enough, the in-game narrative of those last 3 choices takes place only because the cast thinks that something was off.

Bottom line? I think the case could use more polish. In comparison, I liked the previous case better.

-chronodekar
 

Zetas

Lurking upon the deep
Screwing around in Disgaea 6 again. My dumb ass had forgotten to throw a maxed statistician innocent on my xp-farming Witch for the last week. As you can imagine I've been smacking myself since i found out earlier this afternoon.
 

chronodekar

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Finished the 4th case ... or at least the 4th chapter and am doing the 5th. This is arguably a spoiler, but the 4th case does not quite end. We do not get a verdict. Instead, things just bleed over into the 5th case.

In some ways, this looks similar to the very first ace attorney game - the last case has you defending a prosecutor.

There is a side case where a lady comes over to Holmes asking him to search for her lost husband, whom she hasn't seen in the last day. And the case itself is about a guy who got murdered a day ago. At first, I thought both of these would resolve into the same person - but no. It's a narrative red herring. The cases *are* related, but more because the participants in one are present in the other.

Finding out who died surprised me - an inspector/detective we've known over the 2 series. As the case proceeds, it becomes obvious that there might be a connection to something which happened a long, long time ago - a 10 year old case which has been hinted at over the series.

I'm still interested in playing the game, but I need to mention that there is a narrative of corruption going on. That *severely* spoils the fun for me. The game is enjoyable, but it especially feels like things have become very, *very* serious. This is still an Ace Attorney game, but .. -sigh- .. what keeps me going now is narrative - what/why did things happen? From a theme/feeling perspective ... I'm not having fun. :( To the point that I really do *not* recommend the 4th case. At All.

Lets see if the 5th case will redeem things.

-chronodekar
 

chronodekar

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Finished the last case. Where do I begin? On one level, I just didn't like it. Neither this 5th case or the prior 4th case had the FUN element of the earlier plots. It feels like these cases were put together to tie loose plot ends. Which, to be fair, they do. All the broad mysteries we've seen in these 2 games get resolved.

What I'm sad about, is unlike other Ace Attorney games, you really, REALLY need to set aside any expectation of how courtrooms work. For the sake of neutrality, it is expected that the prosecution+defense+judge+jury are not at all related to the cases they act in. For the game, I'll allow them to exclude the jury - it adds a certain fun to the whole affair. But the other 3? It is hard to take courtroom proceedings seriously when at least one of them gets implicated.

What makes the situation worse, is that the game actually calls this out. And it gets swished under the rug with a "that particular situation will be taken care of tomorrow".

If you are a fan of The Great Ace Attorney, these last cases are a must to play - just to get answers. Me? I used a walkthrough.

At this point, I'm having a hard time deciding if I should recommend this game or not. It *is* another Ace Attorney game - with all the fun that brings. But the finale cases? Just disappointing. :(

-chronodekar
 
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